The Ephemeral: All Objects Lost

The Ephemeral: All Objects Lost

Introduction

The Ephemeral: All Objects Lost
All Objects Lost – All Objects Lost

Artist: All Objects Lost
TitleAll Objects Lost
Release Date: 26 Jan 2014
Genre: Ambient World Pop
License: CC BY-ND
Label: Tunguska Electronic Music Society
Rating:

All Objects Lost is a project from Nick Samarin and Polina Voloshina.  On their eponymous debut release they explore ephemeral elements of the world around us.  By mixing a diverse range of ambient electronic textures with middle eastern and African instruments, they create songs that are familiar and fleeting.  The All Objects Lost experience is like looking at a three-dimensional image that captures an event, and the feeling of the event.  They capture the ephemeral: all objects lost.

Tunguska Electronic Music Society Background

This is my first experience listening to music from Tunguska Electronic Music Society.  This Russian based musicians collective was formed around the centenary of the Tunguska event: an explosion in Siberia that many have speculated to have been an asteroid explosion (although there are alternate theories, and there has been much speculation).  The collective has released numerous compilations and recordings focusing mostly on melodic electronic and ambient music styles.  They currently have forty-seven releases, a radio station, and community forum.

The Ephemeral: All Objects Lost

As I mentioned, All Objects Lost is a project from Nick Samarin and Polina Voloshina.  They describe the project as:

…performing atmospheric and dreamy-melodic world/ambient music which sometimes varies from experimental and psychedelic to indie rock and pop. Debut self-titled LP was created in different surroundings with intention to capture feelings of the beautiful moments which are only here and now.

And this is a recording that definitely delivers on those promises.  The songs are strongly melodic, and field a range from ambient to pop music, and beyond.  Anyone familiar with the Buddha Bar records, or Putumayo’s Lounge series, or Six Degrees records will feel right at home with this release.

But, there is more to this release.  These songs are not just about capturing ephemeral moments, or the memory of lost objects.  It’s about movement.  It’s about the journey of life, and the places that we pass through on that journey.  It’s about the choices that we make that lead us to these moments.

This is also a release with a vision for the future.  It’s a vision of a world of infinite possibilities, and infinite choices. It’s a vision of the future in which everyone across all cultures and nationalities can equally make their own choices, and weave their own small piece of the story of the world.

Conclusion

The music of All Objects Lost is engaging and comforting.  It opens the listener to the possibilities of the world around them.  Much of the release leans a little more towards electronic pop music than it does world music.  However, when world elements are introduced into the songs they are effective, and convey a very specific mood.

I have listened to several recent releases from Tunguska Electronic Music Society, and I can say that this release is every bit as strong as the others I have listened to (all these releases will be reviewed in the near future).

This is a release that bodes well for this duo.  All Objects Lost has a whole world to explore, and a whole range of experiences to document for us.  More so, as they document the ephemeral moments of their experiences the listeners will (hopefully) be taken on a journey with them.  All Objects Lost has set a task for themselves: to show us the choices that we can all make for the future.  I for one am ready to continue on this journey, even as I continue to explore the choices in this first release.